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6 WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES

    Women have always understood that beauty involves sacrifice and have been willing to make them. At the very least, these victims’ legs were fatigued from walking in such high heels.

    However, many chose more perilous escapades, which resulted in health issues, some even risked the coquette’s life. Here we found some wrong beauty products that went wrong for so many beauties.

    1. Squeezing Corset dress

    The wasp waist and corsets became trendy in Europe throughout the 18th century, and they were popular not just among women but also among males. They began teaching children to wear corsets from an early age in order to achieve ideal posture.

    The corset supported and raised the chest, constricted the waist, and forced the wearer to maintain their back straight while also squeezing their ribs like a vice.

    wrong beauty products, WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES

    The corset’s ribs, constructed of wood, steel, or whalebone, bore into the flesh, ruthlessly squeezing and occasionally fracturing the ribs, preventing the woman from moving and bending over again. Fainting was widespread owing to a shortage of oxygen.

    6 WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES, coreset dressing

    At least two individuals were required to make the waist grow to 35-40 cm in circumference, and the beauty had to hold on to something with her hands. The constant wearing of a corset resulted in rib distortion and a variety of heart and lung problems. When the mammary glands of women atrophied, back issues developed.

    2. Tapeworms: Parasite

    The fashion for thinness peaked in the twentieth century. Many women were willing to go to any length for a quick and noticeable outcome, even if it meant knowingly allowing a parasite to take up residence in their bodies. The larvae of the bovine tapeworm had to be administered orally in capsules.

    6 WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES, tapeworms beauty products

    The parasite began to take nutrition once inside the host. The lady lost weight, but the worm grew, reaching 50 centimeters in length at times.

    The worm was removed using special preparations or surgical intervention once the desired effect was achieved. A key downside of such a “diet” was the possibility of death. The bull tapeworm did not only eat with its host, but it also multiplied.

    3. Belladonna drops : Drug or Poison

    Belladonna was used to make poisons in ancient Greece and Rome. During witch trials in the Middle Ages, an ointment prepared from this plant was employed, and it induced terrible hallucinations.

    Belladonna juice was first injected into the eyes in Europe throughout the 18th and 19th centuries.

    6 WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES, belladonna juice

    Drops were first popularized by Italian nobles. A few drops of belladonna dilates the pupils, brightens the eyes, and makes them more expressive.

    Simultaneously, vision degraded dramatically, eventually leading to total blindness with continued use. Despite this, the “drug’s” popularity peaked at the turn of the twentieth century.

    4. Arsenic for Glow skin

    Arsenic was once thought to be a miraculous cosmetic treatment in Europe and the United States at the end of the nineteenth century. It was thought to give the eyes a healthy gleam and the face a noble complexion. It was required to start with a little amount of arsenic and progressively increase the amount.

    6 WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES, arsenic beauty products
    6 WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES, arsenic beauty ads
    Advertisement for arsenic wafers in a New York newspaper.

    It accumulated in the body, causing thyroid illness and, in some cases, death. As a result, astute cosmetologists provided women an option in the form of arsenic-based face masks. They were thought to be less dangerous than ingesting the poison. However, there is no difference in actuality.

    5. Foot binding for Lotus Feet

    Foot binding is a Chinese practice that dates back thousands of years. Women’s feet that were less than 10 cm long were referred to as “lotus feet” and were thought to be a sign of femininity. Women had to experience excruciating pain throughout their lives in order to create such a “flower.”

    6 WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES, lotus feet, foot binding
    6 WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES, foot binding, lotus legs feets

    They shattered all of a girl’s toes (save the big ones) and pulled her to the heel as tight as possible when she was seven years old, making her foot look like a curved bow.

    A bandaged leg required frequent attention: compressing blood vessels harmed blood circulation, and ingrown nails might lead to necrosis and abscesses.

    Men thought that a woman’s “lotus legs” made her extraordinarily attractive, but it considered immoral to see women’s legs without shoes or bandages. Given how they appeared, this is not surprising.

    We won’t provide a photo because this is not a show for the faint of heart. When the communists took power, they abolished the practice by prohibiting bandaging. It’s still in place. The final factory that made lotus shoes closed in 1999, and the remaining items were donated to an ethnographic museum.

    6. Radioactive cosmetics on face

    Tho-Radia, a range of women’s cosmetics, began production in France in 1932. Radium was found in the face powder and cream, and it was hailed with amazing abilities. Tho-Radia cosmetics, according to the inventors, made the skin clean and healthy.

    6 WRONG BEAUTY PRODUCTS FROM THE PAST THAT RUINED BEAUTIES, tho radia, radioactive beauty products

    These products contained thorium chloride and radium bromide, which were believed to accelerate cell processes, smooth the skin, and eliminate tiny flaws. Instead, at a cost of 15 francs every 155 gm. ladies were given a minor form of radiation sickness. Despite the fact that radium was known to be harmful, Tho-Radia cosmetics were sold until the 1960s.

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